How To Write Marketing Copy , Part 1

If you’re like many business owners I talk to, you have a hard time writing effective marketing copy to sell your product or service.

You understand that your business value is measured by how well people respond to the marketing messages you send out. You also know that consistently conveying the significance of what you sell is the way to build a loyal base of customers.

But…you just can’t find the words to say when you sit down to actually write.

Well, I’d like to give you a very simple structure to get you started writing all kinds of marketing copy. Some call it the Four Ps, or promise-picture-proof-push.

It’s a great copywriting roadmap to use to ensure you give your reader everything she needs to make a buying decision.

Now, let us look at the first two parts of the Four Ps in detail:

  • Promise

Your marketing has just a few seconds to get your reader’s attention. What are you going to say? Well, start by making a big promise—specifically in your headline and throughout the lead of your marketing piece. For example, let’s say that you sell life insurance. Your big promise might be, “Enjoy peace of mind and pride knowing you provided for your loved ones.” Just understand…if you want your offer read, attract with promises.

  • Picture

Now, how do you make the promise I just told you about real? Do it by painting a picture in your reader’s mind. If done correctly, pictures help your reader to see herself enjoying the benefits of the big promise. Using the life insurance example, perhaps you would create a convincing picture by describing how her family’s needs would be taken care of after she is gone, because she bought that life insurance. A compelling picture stimulates desire in your reader.

Well, that’s it for now.

Tomorrow I’ll give you the next two components to include whenever you want to produce results-driven marketing copy for your business.

To your business achievement,
Tanya

www.HandyCopywriting.com

P.S. Do you like marketing advice in small bite-able chunks? Make sure you follow me on Twitter.

How Not To Conduct Your Small Business Marketing

If you just met someone in a bookstore…you wouldn’t seriously ask him or her to marry you. Would you?

You’d get to know the person. Maybe you’d spend time having special talks, walks and dinners. Flowers and chocolate might even be nice, too.

But, definitely, you’d try to connect with them.

Well, marketing your small business should be no different.

If a person just encountered your business via your sales letter, website or some other marketing piece, they don’t know you. They have no idea if your product or service will do what you say.

So…get a conversation started. Then, keep up the conversation using persuasive marketing copy in combination with a well-crafted multichannel marketing campaign.

As you do this, your potential and existing customers get to know you better over time.

To your attainment,
Tanya

www.HandyCopywriting.com

P.S. Got questions? Email them to me or leave them in the comments. I’ll attempt to answer them in a future post.

Why Most Marketing Copy Stinks

There are two reasons.

NUMBER 1: The opening is fuzzy.

And how do you know that it is? Perhaps you’re engaging in small talk. Well, your marketing isn’t the place for small talk. Small talk loses readers. Lost readers bring low response.

Or maybe your point is unclear. But get this…you should be persuading people to reply.

Make your reason for reading difficult to miss.

Quickly communicate what you want to say. Your reader has only one thought in mind: “What’s in it for me?”

Get to the point.

NUMBER 2: The ending spurs no action.

Tell your reader how to respond.

When you close, be persuasive and authoritative, and repeat the reasons why your prospect should reply.

If a reader reaches the end of your marketing copy and fails to reply, this is no good. I mean, you did get them to read to the end. It’s time to make the sell.

Don’t end weak.

When you sit down to write your marketing copy, you want to make sure you’re doing it for the right reasons—to make a sale or get a response.

So increase your chances of getting the action you want by writing an effective open and close.

To your sales success,

Tanya

www.HandyCopywriting.com

P.S. Follow Handy Copywriting on Facebook by clicking right here.